Transperia Group, Inc.
Transformational Experiences That Drive Business Results

Archive for October, 2008

The Open Face

Wednesday, October 29th, 2008

One of the most compelling trainers on the art of communication I’ve ever met is a gentleman named Arch Lustberg.

Arch has trained tens of thousands of leaders and professionals over his long career and has worked with political figures, entertainers and high-level executives.  I’ve had the privilege of working with Arch on several occasions and each time has been a true blessing to me.  I always learn something new from him.

One of Arch’s most effective training points is what he calls “The Open Face”.  It is so simple, yet so powerful.  I’ve seen Arch take someone on stage and watched him transform the person’s communication skills in a matter of moments, simply by applying this principle.  I’ve also taken some of the principles of the “Open Face” and applied them to my personal life (such as how I communicate with my children).

I could take time telling you about it, but thought it better for you to hear it directly from Arch.  Watch this video of Arch discussing “The Open Face” (it’s less than 2 minutes long).

Arch has also written a wonderful book called, “How to Sell Yourself”.  It’s definitely worth your time and the 15 bucks.

Also, if you are in need of a keynote speaker for an event, Arch is an amazing choice.  You can get more info on his website.  And be sure to tell him that Mark Bennardo, from Transperia, sent you (and don’t forget to ask him about the time I saved his life)!

The 1-Minute Speech and the Economy of Words

Friday, October 24th, 2008

StopwatchOne of my first communication courses in college (many moons ago) required students to give a one-minute speech.  The speech had to tell something interesting about ourselves and our home towns. One minute—that’s it.  Go over and you fail the assignment.

Our professor’s point was simple:  a speech can never be considered too short if it holds attention and makes a memorable point.  It can be, (and most usually are), however, too long.

It was tough.  The art of effective communication is really tested when you are limited in the amount of time/words you can use. It was a really good exercise, and one I strongly encourage you to try.

The “economy of words” is an important principle to keep in mind when writing/speaking.  It would seem that more words would bring more clarity, but ironically, the more words we use, the more cluttered the message becomes.

Thomas Jefferson is credited with saying, “The most valuable of all talents is that of never using two words when one will do.”

This has been my shortest post so far. I’m trying to practice what I preach.